Category Archives: Educational

Small Dog Syndrome

When we get a new large-breed puppy, we always think, “We’d better get that puppy in Training as soon as possible because when he grows up, we won’t be able to handle him.” It is often a different story when we get a small breed pup. We think that because he will still be small as an adult, we will be able “handle him”, and that we really don’t need to get professional training for him. I think that is a common mistake by many small dog owners.

COMMON SMALL DOG BEHAVIOR

I’ll bet you have some friends or neighbors with an annoying little yappy dog? You know the ones I’m talking about… As much as you love dogs, whenever you see the little “ankle biter”, it’s not at all enjoyable. He’s constantly yipping. He’s all over you… jumping on your leg and in your lap when you sit down… getting in your face. And how annoying is it when he’s licking your face repeatedly? You keep pulling him away from your face and he keeps coming back. It’s not cute. The one I find particularly irritating is the one who growls at you for no apparent reason, except that you’re in his house or that you are too close to his owner. You just never know if he’s going to snap at you or what! These behaviors, and many others are all typical for what we refer to “Small dog syndrome”.

WHAT EXACTLY IS SMALL DOG SYNDROME (SDS)?

Some of the behaviors that make up SDS include jumping (on their owners, on others and on other dogs), growling at other people or dogs, not listening to commands, acting nervous or even neurotic, constant or frequent barking, lunging, snapping, or nipping, demanding attention (affection, treats), etc. These behaviors can occur in any size dog but are more prevalent in smaller dogs.

We’ve all heard the term “Napoleon” syndrome, referring to Napoléon Bonaparte, a 17th century French emperor and military leader, who apparently was just over 5 feet tall, but was a force to be reckoned with. Because of his small size, over the years people have used the phrase “napoleon syndrome” or “napoleon complex” to describe someone who attempts to overcompensate for his size or stature. The term “Small dog syndrome” comes from its correlation to “Napoleon Syndrome”.

It is debatable whether small dogs who suffer from SDS literally realize that they are small. Are they acting the way they act because of a need to overcompensate for their size – like Napoleon? Or are they acting that way because, well, to put it in plain terms, because they’re spoiled rotten? Many Trainer’s believe that the behavior displayed with SDS is simply learned. We have allowed our small dogs to break all the rules… things we would never allow a big dog to do. And although we think we are showing love and affection by not correcting them and letting them to have their way, the result is that they are actually feeling very nervous, anxious and insecure.

HOW TO “FIX” SMALL DOG SYNDROME

Here’s the good news… It’s not genetic and it can be “treated”. How do we undo what we have already done?

Here are a couple of suggestions for “untraining” your dog. First of all, don’t pick him up. Small dogs are so much easier to handle because we can simply scoop them up when they are misbehaving. Picking your dog up when they are barking at another dog, for instance, can be seen as a reward to your dog and make them feel that barking is a good behavior. If you are always picking your small dog up when they are misbehaving OR when they seem scared/insecure, you will only see more of that behavior occur.

Next, teach your dog to start walking properly on a leash. I mean, fess up… You’ve been carrying him a lot, right? Dogs who walk on a leash are more confident and that’s something we need to develop. Put him on the ground and if he becomes frightened for any reason, resist picking him up, but stay close beside him so he has the assurance that you’re right there. If he takes a few steps on his own, reward him with his favorite treat. If he whimpers and jumps on your leg to be picked up, correct him by calmly and gently placing him back on the ground and proceed to walk with him. Remember, we use praise and affection to reinforce good behaviors. So when your pup responds to the behavior you like, reward him quickly.

Thirdly, establish yourself as his leader. Up to this point, he has been the leader and you have unknowingly reinforced that belief by your treatment of him. By avoiding picking him up and teaching him to walk properly on a leash, you will begin to establish yourself as the leader. Your dog needs a strong leader. Don’t be afraid to set boundaries and to firmly but gently teach him what is acceptable and what is not acceptable behavior.

We recommend you consult with one of our Professional Dog Trainers for help in breaking the bad habits that have been allowed to this point. Retraining your dog is not an easy task. With your Trainer’s help, consistent enforcement of good behavior, proper socialization, and establishing yourself as a leader, your little guy will make a huge improvement.

Why Socialization is So Important for a Growing Puppy | Everything is new to puppies. From the moment they're born, like any human child, they're learning. They learn to trust Mommy and to watch out for their little brother when he comes around with those sharp teeth! | Doggie Daycare 205.777.3699

Why Socialization is So Important for a Growing Puppy

Why Socialization is So Important for a Growing Puppy | Everything is new to puppies. From the moment they’re born, like any human child, they’re learning. They learn to trust Mommy and to watch out for their little brother when he comes around with those sharp teeth! They learn the difference between playing and real danger. They learn which noises mean good things are coming (Dinnertime!), and which mean that something bad is about to happen. As they grow and venture further away from Mom and the clan, their fear instincts drive them scampering back to the safety of their mother and littermates until they can differentiate between real dangers and innocent things.

5 Reasons Why Your Puppy Misbehaves | You return from a quick trip to the store, and no longer own a living room couch. You do, however, own a pile of shredded upholstery and ripped foam padding, for which you have no use. | Just Happy Hounds 205.777.3699

Why Puppies Have Fear

Their fear is a defense mechanism until they gain the knowledge and experience to stay safe. The strongest period of active socialization for a puppy is from the age of three weeks to twelve weeks. Learning, of course, continues after that. But those weeks are crucial for puppy to begin to understand that people, other animals, children, and typical situations aren’t something to fear. They are positive experiences to be enjoyed.

Socialization Keeps Dogs Out of Shelters

Poor socialization is one of the primary causes of behavioral issues in dogs, and unfortunately, behavior problems are the number-one reason dogs wind up in shelters. In order for your relationship with your new puppy to develop into a lifelong companionship, good socialization is essential. Of course, most owners don’t even get possession of their puppies until age 6 to 8 weeks. That means you have barely a month to make the most out of that critical socialization period.

Socialization Versus Overwhelming Your Pup

But socialization isn’t about immersing your new pup into tons of new people and experiences. Young puppies are easily overwhelmed with “sensory overload,” and coming on too strong can trigger that fear instinct — having the opposite effect of good socialization. That’s why it’s wise to balance good socialization with smart exposure and plenty of safety, security, and rest in between new people and experiences.

How to Properly Socialize Your Puppy

Exposing your new puppy to a variety of people, animals, events, and experiences should be done slowly, one at a time. Each day of that critical month, make sure your puppy meets someone new or goes somewhere different. Venture out and meet new people when puppy is well-rested, well-fed, and under no other stresses. For example, don’t expect him to have a positive experience with someone new just after he gets his shots or right after a bath he really didn’t want.

Good socialization exposes your pup to a variety of safe, positive experiences. Consider introducing them to:

  • People of different colors and cultural backgrounds
  • Men and women in uniform
  • Children and babies
  • Older people
  • Other animals, particularly those he’ll see regularly, such as nearby horses, other dogs, and the neighborhood cats
  • People he will regularly be exposed to, such as the mailman, your in-laws, and the neighbor kids
  • Places you regularly visit and want to take your dog when he’s grown, such as local parks, the vet’s office, the pet supply store, and other public areas where dogs are allowed
  • Get him in doggie daycare as soon as possible, so that he gets used to the people and animals there during the critical socialization period

Socialization: Slow & Easy

Introduce puppy to only small groups, perhaps one or two at a time. Start with the people you know who are used to dogs, especially those with calm demeanors and gentle personalities. You might want to wait until Pup has had many positive experiences with new people to introduce him to particularly boisterous kids or adults who tend to be “loud talkers” or have energetic personalities. Dogs naturally pick up on the emotional climate of the people and animals around them, so be sure those experiences are overwhelmingly positive as your puppy gets well socialized.

Puppy’s First Prances in the Dog Park

If you have a local dog park you’re excited about visiting with your dog, use caution when introducing him there. Make sure he’s gotten all of his vaccinations first, and that your vet okay’s the excursion. Begin taking him during the least-busy hours, such as early in the mornings or in the middle of the weekday, when everyone’s at work. Don’t go on Saturday afternoon until your pup is well-adjusted and acclimated to other animals and people. A new puppy could be traumatized by a bunch of big dogs before he knows the drill!

Safety Comes First in Socialization

If you have small children, introduce them slowly, allowing both the child and the puppy to learn the scope of acceptable behavior. For example, instruct the child on how to treat the dog (No, no! We don’t pull Rover’s fur!) and make sure the puppy isn’t too aggressive with the child. He’s used to being able to wrestle and nip with his littermates, and won’t yet understand that it isn’t okay to nip the baby. Prepare a safe, comfortable place for puppy to go if things get out of hand and he needs to settle down.

Be ready to remove your puppy quickly from any situation if things get out of hand. For example, toddlers often don’t know the difference between “fun play” and hurting the puppy, such as pulling his tail or poking him in the nose. While the child absolutely means no harm, these experiences might cause him to shy away or become defensive around children in the future, which is unhealthy for both the dog and the children.

How Doggie Daycare Plays a Critical Role in Good Puppy Socialization

Honestly, most new dog owners find it difficult to get the time to expose their new babies to all the different people and situations they need to get used to. That’s why doggie daycare is such a blessing. Not only will Puppy benefit from a well-trained and highly-knowledgeable staff of caregivers, he’ll have easy, safe access to other well-adjusted dogs. Nothing helps a new puppy learn the ropes more than being around older dogs who know the score.

Additionally, they’ll meet a wide variety of other pet owners as they come to drop off an pick up their pets. He will meet the nice lady who smells like baked bread, the big guy in the shiny officer’s uniform, and people of all colors, nationalities, and personalities. Doggie daycare is also the best way to assure that he doesn’t develop any separation anxiety or shred the furniture when left alone at home.

Looking for an excellent doggie daycare for your new pup? At Just Happy Hounds, your new best friend is our new best friend. Contact us for more information on the perfect doggie daycare for socializing your new pup!

Because we love em’ like you do!

Just Happy Hounds, LLC – Midtown – where we make sit happen!

We’re located at 2222 5th Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama  35233

your premiere dog fraternity providing doggie daycare, dog boarding, dog grooming and dog training.

205.777.3699

The Business Traveler's Guide to Owning a Pet | Business travelers often long for companionship, & what better companion can you have than a loving pet whose greatest thrill is seeing you come home? Frequent business travels don't necessarily mean you have to give up your dream of owning a | Dog Boarding 205.777.3699

The Business Traveler’s Guide to Owning a Pet

The Business Traveler’s Guide to Owning a Pet | Business travelers often long for companionship, and what better companion can you have than a loving pet whose greatest thrill is seeing you come home? Frequent business travels don’t necessarily mean you have to give up your dream of owning a pet. But there are several important considerations for you, your job, and the adorable love you bring into your life. Here’s the ultimate business traveler’s guide to pet ownership.

Can You Realistically Care for a Pet?

Just like opening that box from Amazon and realizing that the shirt you purchased is a dim replica of what you envisioned when you clicked “Buy,” sometimes owning a pet when you travel all the time can be disillusioning. Take some time to visually walk through a week of your life with a pet. What will you do when you come in exhausted and they’re ready to play? How will you handle flight delays when the sitter has an obligation and has to leave? Make sure your vision of pet ownership matches reality. Consider some options to owning a pet. For example, you can pet sit for another friend sometimes, so that you get snuggle time without feeling guilty when you have to leave. Or, you can volunteer with the local pet shelter, or adopt a pet for a local child in need, and visit sometimes. Just be sure that your life is conducive to pet ownership before signing up for the job.

The Business Traveler's Guide to Owning a Pet | Business travelers often long for companionship, & what better companion can you have than a loving pet whose greatest thrill is seeing you come home? Frequent business travels don't necessarily mean you have to give up your dream of owning a | Dog Boarding 205.777.3699

What Kind of Pet Best Fits Your Lifestyle?

Would you prefer a dog to walk and wrestle with when you’re home? Or a cat who’s basically self-sufficient for a few days at a time? Can you afford to board your dog during your trips? Would it be best to adopt an older dog, or raise a puppy who can learn to adapt to your lifestyle? Also, consider some alternatives to cats and dogs, such as ferrets, rats, aquariums, hamsters, gerbils, or reptiles (lizards and snakes). There is an amazing variety of pets that aren’t the traditional cat-or-dog option, but still bring love and joy to their owners!

Training is the Key to Making Pet Ownership Work for Business Travelers

Most people do settle on a cat or dog, and if you choose a dog, training is essential. Training will help the dog connect with you, learn to anticipate your schedule and adapt well to interruptions in the normal routine. Plus, you’ll have a much easier time boarding your dog or getting someone to agree to pet sit if your canine is well behaved. Both puppies and grown dogs benefit from solid training, and there are several options available. Business travelers might prefer doggie retreats, where the dog spends several weeks in intensive spa-like training. Or, you can take a dog training seminar and go it DIY. Alternately, you and your dog can meet with a trainer, either one-on-one or in a group, and enjoy the bonding and training experience together while you’re in town.

Can You Take a Pet With You When You Travel?

A well-trained dog (and many well-behaved kitties) can go along with you on all or most of your business trips. Many hotels and motels have pet policies in place to allow you to bring Fido or Fluffy. Be sure to invest in all of the essentials, including an FAA-approved pet carrier (preferably one you can use as a crate in the hotel), travel food and water bowls, automated feeders for when they’re left solo for long periods, toys to keep them comfortable and entertained, and treats to reward good behavior. Many pet owners alternate between boarding their pets and bringing them along, giving the dog a wide variety of entertaining and enriching experiences.

What are Your Options When They Can’t Tag Along?

There will almost certainly be times when you can’t bring your pet with you, and that’s okay, because there are tons of safe, secure, rewarding options. When you use the same boarding facilities all the time, your pet will come to expect it. They will even bond with the workers and look forward to their visits! Most facilities also offer additional services, such as grooming, so that you can return home to a dog who’s already had his bath and is ready to snuggle! Alternately, you can have a pet/house sitter, or hire a dog walker to visit your pet frequently while you’re away. Just beware of pet sitters you don’t know personally — there are too many scams out there on Craigslist, Facebook Marketplace, and other public sites. Cat owners can often get by with a couple of litter boxes and an automatic feeder, if the business trips aren’t too long. Petcams are another excellent option, allowing you to keep an eye on your beloved pet while you’re away. Many even allow you to talk to them and interact with them right through your smartphone.

Be Prepared for Emergencies While You’re Traveling

Flights get delayed. Clients take longer than they should. Pet sitters get sick, and the next-door neighbors have to suddenly leave town to care for a family member. The bottom line is, you should always have contingency plans, whether you bring your pet along or leave them at home with caregivers. The ideal situation is a professional (not in someone’s backyard) pet boarding facility, with a staff of trained and experienced pet caregivers who will love your pet just like you do. There are several advantages. First, if one worker gets sick and can’t make it in, they have a full staff of other workers, so your pet won’t go without! Second, they are able to train your pet, not just “pet sit”. Third, they have access to veterinary care in case your baby gets ill while you’re away.

Last, but not least, these people aren’t just “in it for the money”. They have dedicated their lives to taking care of animals! For the pet boarding options every seasoned business traveler needs, visit Just Happy Hounds today.

Because we love em’ like you do!

Just Happy Hounds, LLC – Midtown – where we make sit happen!

We’re located at 2222 5th Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama  35233

your premiere dog fraternity providing doggie daycare, dog boarding, dog grooming and dog training.

205.777.3699

How Does Matted Fur Affect Your Pet's Health | Long-haired cats and dogs are immensely popular, because long, luscious coats are simply gorgeous. Who doesn't love to snuggle up with a super fluffy pet? But many pet owners don't realize that grooming simply isn't optional for their long-haired lovies. | 205.777.3699

How Does Matted Fur Affect Your Pet’s Health

How Does Matted Fur Affect Your Pet’s Health | Long-haired cats and dogs are immensely popular, because long, luscious coats are simply gorgeous. Who doesn’t love to snuggle up with a super fluffy pet? But many pet owners don’t realize that grooming simply isn’t optional for their long-haired lovies. They start out brushing daily, then weekly, and eventually even a monthly brushing is rare.

How Does Matted Fur Affect Your Pet's Health | Long-haired cats and dogs are immensely popular, because long, luscious coats are simply gorgeous. Who doesn't love to snuggle up with a super fluffy pet? But many pet owners don't realize that grooming simply isn't optional for their long-haired lovies. | 205.777.3699

Since matting occurs at the base of the hairs, not the outer ends that are visible, it is common for mats to build substantially without the owner even being aware of it. Not only is the extent of the matting hidden, those mats can hide a multitude of issues that aren’t just unsightly — these can be downright dangerous to your pet’s health. Here are some of the ways fur matting affects the health of your dog or cat.

Matted Fur Causes Pulling & Discomfort

Obviously, matted fur makes brushing very painful for your pet. But even if you aren’t brushing it out, the mats pull at the skin and make it uncomfortable to walk, run, lie down, or sit. Since pets, dogs especially, tend to hide their pain from their family, you might not even realize those mats are hurting. If the mats get too bad, groomers have no choice but to shave off the fur. This can sometimes cause permanent changes to the look of your pet. Regular brushing and professional grooming prevents this from becoming an issue.

Matted Fur Can Cut Blood Flow to the Legs & Tail

Once the mats are embedded in the fur around the legs, posterior, and tail, the pulling can become so intense that it literally cuts off blood flow to these extremities. Though rare, in the most serious cases this can lead to the loss of limbs. Long-haired breeds like the popular Labradoodle, Wheaten Terrier, Bearded Collie, Yorkies, and others can become this seriously matted, even while the top layer looks smooth. Without regular brushing and grooming, mats this severe can develop unnoticed.

Matted Fur Can Cause Open Wounds

As the hair follicles pull against the skin, and the mats prevent air circulation across the skin, that area never fully dries. Like any skin that is constantly exposed to moisture and heat, wounds can develop. Open sores are then susceptible to foreign matter, like stickers and burrs, which aren’t just exceptionally painful, they also contain germs that introduce even more potential for infection. Conditions like this can lead to loss of limbs and even become fatal if not addressed properly and promptly.

Matted Fur Can Hide Disease & Pests

Matted fur tends to catch up any germs and nastiness that the dog or cat happens by. It’s like a catch-all for yuckiness. Additionally, mats create a safe haven for pests, including fleas, mites, ticks, and even fly larvae (yep, maggots). Matted fur also hides any skin issues that are indicative of the pet’s overall health. For instance, certain diseases like Diabetes and Hyperthyroidism often exhibit signs on the skin. Being able to detect these changes in skin color and condition (such as redness or dryness) helps catch these problems early. Early treatment means a much more positive outcome in the long term.

Grooming doesn’t have to be a big deal, though. Set aside a regular time to brush your pet, just like you schedule time to mow the lawn or check your fire alarms. It’s just one of those things you have to do on a regular basis. Partner with a professional groomer who can keep your cat or dog free of mats that can lead to health problems. This has an additional benefit: the groomer gets used to your pet’s skin condition, and is another valuable set of eyes when it comes to detecting changes that could indicate a change in their medical condition.

Clean, well-groomed pets are happy pets, and happy pets make happy owners. Get started on your better grooming habits at Just Happy Hounds today!

Because we love em’ like you do!

Just Happy Hounds, LLC – Midtown – where we make sit happen!

We’re located at 2222 5th Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama  35233

your premiere dog fraternity providing doggie daycare, dog boarding, dog grooming and dog training.

205.777.3699

 

Why You Should Never Train a Dog Like You See on TV | There are more than 43 million pet owners in the U.S., and together they own about 70 million dogs! This statistic wasn't lost on television networks, which set about producing a variety of shows aimed at "helping" pet owners train their dogs. Instead of leaning

Why You Should Never Train a Dog Like You See on TV

Why You Should Never Train a Dog Like You See on TV | There are more than 43 million pet owners in the U.S., and together they own about 70 million dogs! This statistic wasn’t lost on television networks, which set about producing a variety of shows aimed at “helping” pet owners train their dogs. Instead of leaning to local pet trainers, who are both trained and experienced in handling and teaching dogs, many dog owners instead turn to the advice doled out by popular shows like Dog Whisperer, It’s Me or the Dog, Good Dog U, and Celebrity Dog School.

 

Why You Should Never Train a Dog Like You See on TV | There are more than 43 million pet owners in the U.S., and together they own about 70 million dogs! This statistic wasn't lost on television networks, which set about producing a variety of shows aimed at "helping" pet owners train their dogs. Instead of leaning

While each of the stars of these shows has their own techniques, theories, and qualifications, it’s important to understand that these shows are more “reality show” entertainment than actual dog training. In fact, the shows all come with their own disclaimers, stating in one way or another, not to try these techniques at home, especially without the guidance of a dog training professional.

Why to Never ‘Try This at Home’

What’s wrong with trying to use the techniques we see used with such incredible success with the likes of Cesar Millan and Victoria Stilwell on their shows? Well, like any reality show, what you see on screen is a very abbreviated, and not at all accurate, picture of the overall process.

For example, these professionals begin a 30-minute show with a dog experiencing sometimes serious behavioral problems — biting, food guarding, excessive barking, fear, and even outright dangerous aggression. At the end of half an hour, the dog and its family are seemingly in blissful happiness, all the deep-rooted issues all but disappeared.

Why You Should Never Train a Dog Like You See on TV

In reality, countless hours, spent by knowledgeable and experienced professionals, went into any changes you see. It takes months or longer to achieve real progress when significant behavioral issues are present. And there are instances in which dogs are never fully able to overcome serious issues that were rooted in them since puppyhood. The time, expertise, and effort involved in the changes are grotesquely underplayed, while the results are often overblown, at the least. If you listen carefully, even the TV stars sometimes admit they worked with the animals for weeks, sometimes months, to bring about any progress.

Like all reality shows, when it comes down to it, you’re seeing anything but true reality.

It’s impossible, even for a regular viewer paying close attention, to get the full scope of what went into the training and behavioral changes. Again, each of these TV dog experts comes from different ideologies — some placing more emphasis on the owner’s behaviors than the dog’s. Others focusing more on environment or feeding routines or socialization than on actual “dog training”. Some of these TV “experts” have even fallen under harsh criticism from animal activist groups, who claim their techniques are cruel and abusive.

Before you get reported to the police for animal cruelty, it’s important to know that no harsh treatment, certainly no abuse, is at all necessary to train a dog and foster good behavior. Even owners whose pets are experiencing behavioral issues can relax knowing that a good dog trainer can help their pet learn to “be a good boy” without hitting, dominating, or denying affection. But it does take a trainer who is himself or herself trained in the act of dog training, and an owner who is willing to bring their dog to training regularly and learn what they can do to help their dog become a better member of society, or at least the family.

Your Real Dog Training Options

There are several types of training to choose from. You can go to a seminar and learn the basics, which you can then apply your interactions with your dog at home. Or, you can bring your pet to regular sessions with a trainer who can both teach the dog good behavior and help the owner learn the best way to handle the dog. For those who want the ultimate dog training experience, doggie camps immerse the dog in a wholesome training environment for several weeks. The dog learns to obey common commands, socialize with people and other animals, and to overcome any bad habits he picked up before. These doggie “resort” camps are ideal for new puppies just learning the ropes, as well as for rescue dogs or those who have developed some unhealthy ways of coping.

At Just Happy Hounds, we love ’em like you do, bad habits and all AND we make sit happen! We believe that underneath every grumpy dog is a loving, happy, healthy pup just dying to get out. We help them find the best inner-dog they can be.

Contact Just Happy Hounds to schedule the ideal dog training option for you and your beloved pet today!

Because…

…we love em’ like you do AND we make sit happen!

Just Happy Hounds, LLC – Midtown located at 2222 5th Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama  35233

your premiere dog fraternity providing doggie daycare, dog boarding, grooming and training.

205.777.3699

Just Happy Hounds THE premier dog fraternity to enhance your dog's life | 205.777.3699

The 9 Most Common Mistakes When Grooming a Dog | Pet ownership is one of the greatest joys on earth. Where else can you get such unconditional love and unlimited affection -- even when you're grumpy, look like death, or are having the absolute worst day imaginable?

The 9 Most Common Mistakes When Grooming a Dog

The 9 Most Common Mistakes When Grooming a Dog | Pet ownership is one of the greatest joys on earth. Where else can you get such unconditional love and unlimited affection — even when you’re grumpy, look like death, or are having the absolute worst day imaginable? But owning a dog is a lot of work. Remember those “before you get a dog” books and blogs you read before adopting? Yeah, they weren’t joking.

The 9 Most Common Mistakes When Grooming a Dog | Pet ownership is one of the greatest joys on earth. Where else can you get such unconditional love and unlimited affection -- even when you're grumpy, look like death, or are having the absolute worst day imaginable?

There’s a lot to this “owning a dog” thing, and it’s more than just housebreaking, regular walks, and teaching Gypsy not to jump up on your mom when she visits. Every breed requires regular grooming, no matter what kind of fur they have or what conditions they’re kept in.

The 9 Most Common Mistakes When Grooming a Dog

Grooming is more than just a bath; it requires brushing, nail clipping, checking for pests like ear mites and fleas, and cleaning and de-knotting a few areas that she’d probably rather you just left alone. Here are the most common mistakes pet owners make when grooming their dogs.

1. Getting a Breed You Aren’t Prepared to Care for

“This breed doesn’t shed,” they said. Yeah, right! This myth is often spoken of certain terriers, poodles, Shih Tzu, and even Siberian huskies. Lies, all lies! All breeds shed off older hairs to grow new ones, and some breeds, like the cold-loving husky, don’t shed — they molt! Molting involves sloughing off an entire layer of fur undercoating at the end of the cold season. We’re not talking about shedding hairs. We’re talking literal garbage bags full of fluffy undercoating. Longer-haired dogs are adorable, but it’s best to avoid these unless you’re able and willing to invest time in regular brushing. Matted fur can actually affect your dog’s health in several ways. Short-hair breeds usually leave a trail of tiny hairs all over everything if not regularly bathed and brushed.

2. Waiting Too Long to Introduce Your Puppy to the Grooming Process

Like small children, puppies aren’t yet set in their ways, and they can learn early what’s expected of them. If you wait until the dog is older to get her used to regular grooming, you’ll face much more resistance than you will if she’s taught early that baths, brushing, and a bit of prodding, poking, and pulling is just part of life.

3. Failing to Properly Train Your Dog

If you aren’t yet convinced of the value of professional dog training, attempt to bathe an untrained dog by yourself. Whether big or small, a dog who doesn’t want a bath becomes a formidable foe when soaked with water and oozing slippery bubbles! A basic training course establishes you as the Alpha, or pack leader, but it also teaches your dog simple commands like “sit” and “stay” that are invaluable come grooming time.

4. Grooming Too Infrequently (Especially in Wintertime)

Waiting too long between grooming sessions means the grooming process is harder for both you and your dog. It’s harder for you, because they’re not used to it and put up a fight. It’s harder for them, because they’re filthy, matted, and may be overrun with parasites or other problems. Consistency is key, both to keep your dog used to the grooming tools and process, and to keep her healthy and happy. Who wants everyone to avoid their precious pup because she stinks?

5. Playing the Wrong Ways With Your Dog

Getting your dog to bark, run, or play-fight with the garden hose, hair dryer, electric shaver, or other common tools similar to dog grooming tools teaches them to act up at grooming time instead of submitting to and benefiting from the process. Save the play fights for objects you don’t need them to work with later on.

6. Leaving the Grooming Incomplete

Many dog owners focus on brushing the more visible areas, like the back, forgetting about the hidden areas, which actually mat worse and cause more pain and problems. The rear is the most common area for mats, followed by the legs and belly. Brush the whole dog regularly and thoroughly. Dogs need brushing before they’re exposed to water, as well as after. Mats that get drenched in a puddle are much harder (and ouchy) to get out than those that remain dry. Brush well before playing in the water, and brush and bathe right after, too.

7. Using the Wrong Grooming Tools & Products

Human brushes and nail clippers are just not designed for use on dogs. Specialized grooming tools aren’t that expensive, but make an incredible difference on how well they work and how much less painful grooming is for your dog.

8. Shaving Cold-Weather Breeds in the Summertime

Dogs bread for the cold (Malamutes, Huskies, Samoyed, Bernese, Pyrenees, St. Bernard, etc.) are generally miserable in the Alabama summer. It’s tempting to shave them down to keep them cool. But these breeds’ skin doesn’t have the sun protection that short-haired dogs do. Their sun protection is actually in the fur. Shaving your cold-weather-breed dog can cause them to sunburn and make them more susceptible to skin cancer and other sun- and UV-related issues. Let them keep their gorgeous fir and allow them to escape summer’s heat by coming indoors or providing them with cooling options like abundant shade, a plastic swimming pool (with fresh clean water!), and plenty of drinking water. Never use ice in your dog’s water bowl, though, because that can cause health issues like stomach flipping.

9. Cutting the Fur & Nails Too Close

Trimming too close hurts! You can nick the skin, causing a painful, bloody sore. Dogs actually have the “quick” of the nail roughly halfway up the nail. This means that cutting too close can cause your dog serious pain, bleeding, and perhaps make her trust you a little less. You can often see the “quick” on dogs with white or light-colored nails and avoid it, but it’s nearly impossible to tell where that sensitive point is on black nails. Trim only the bare minimum, or better yet, trust the grooming and nail clipping to the professionals.

The 9 Most Common Mistakes When Grooming a Dog

Just Happy Hounds offers full-service dog grooming, and we promise your dog will be kept as comfortable and relaxed as possible during the whole thing. Bring your puppies as early as possible so that they get used to it young. But we can easily help you with your older dogs, too, even rescues with skittish natures or outright phobias.

At Just Happy Hounds, we love ’em like you do and treat your dog as if he or she were our very own!  For more information about dog grooming and Just Happy Hounds, please feel free to contact us at 205.777.3699.

Just Happy Hounds THE premier dog fraternity to enhance your dog's life | 205.777.3699

Why Friends & Family May be the Worst Option for Boarding Your Pet | When it comes time for that long-overdue week at the beach or that exhausting 3-day business conference across the country, what do you do with your pet? Many pet owners save money by sending their beloved cats and dogs to grandma's | 205.777.3699

Why Friends & Family May be the Worst Option for Boarding Your Pet

Why Friends & Family May be the Worst Option for Boarding Your Pet | When it comes time for that long-overdue week at the beach or that exhausting 3-day business conference across the country, what do you do with your pet? Many pet owners save money by sending their beloved cats and dogs to “grandma’s house” or to a neighbor, sibling, or other friend or family member.

Why Friends & Family May be the Worst Option for Boarding Your Pet | When it comes time for that long-overdue week at the beach or that exhausting 3-day business conference across the country, what do you do with your pet? Many pet owners save money by sending their beloved cats and dogs to grandma's | 205.777.3699

Of course this is the best option if the family knows your pet and the pet is used to their home and lifestyle. But if the family isn’t especially close to you and your animal, there are a few reasons to consider boarding instead of the “friends and family” route. Here are a few things to think about before packing Fluffy and Fido up and sending them to your sister’s best friend’s hairdresser’s little cousin’s house.

Asking Friends & Family to Assume Liability for Your Pet

The plan is simple. Go. Play. Have fun. Come home. The end.

In reality, any number of things can (and, unfortunately, often do) happen when your pet is at a friend or family member’s home. What if someone comes to their home that your dog feels is a threat, and your dog bites? What if they escape the backyard or slip the leash? What if your dog chews up their $800 drapes or mistakes their cat for an intruding vermin?

Elderly neighbors, friends with rowdy, rambunctious kids, and unexpected animals roaming the neighborhood — these are just a few instances in which your pet could unwillingly cause injury or damage. Would you be liable? Would your trusted pet sitter be liable? Usually, it’s best not to put your friends and family in these situations when a viable pet boarding option is available.

Friends & Family Have Emergencies, Too

Ideally, the visit will go splendidly. Your trusted friend won’t have a work crisis or family emergency that suddenly captures all their time and attention. But what would they do if they were keeping your pet and their mom had to go to the hospital, or work demanded that they stay and work overtime?

When you board your pet, they have a full staff available, so that if someone gets the flu or their child falls off a bicycle and has to go to the ER, someone else is available to be there for your pet. With friends and family, these crisis can cause serious issues for you, your friend, and your precious pet.

There Can be Conflicts With Family Members or Other Pets in the Home

Chemistry is everything. A well-socialized dog usually adjusts quickly to new people and animals, but rescue dogs or those who isn’t exposed much to new situations don’t always blend well with other family members or household pets. For example, your dog may adore your coworker, but when she gets him home, he may have a personality clash with her husband or another animal in the home.

On holidays, during the summertime, at Spring Break, and other times, local pet boarding facilities may book up — meaning that there’s no last-minute alternative if your pet isn’t jiving well with the home and family he’s supposed to stay with. Unless these are people you know extremely well and trust unfailingly, it’s probably best to make boarding options instead of relying on friends or extended family so you don’t have to worry about why friends & family may be the worst option for boarding your pet so you don’t have to worry about why friends & family may be the worst option for boarding your pet.

What if There’s a Medical Emergency With Your Pet?

In an environment they aren’t used to, it’s easier for your pet to become ill or injured than it would be in your own home, where he’s used to everything. Maybe they buy a different brand of dog food, or perhaps they’re more lax when it comes to feeding scraps and serving “people food”. Older dogs can slip on wet floors or miss a stair, just like an older person might.

Be sure that you and your friend/family are clear on who would be responsible for any emergency vet bills that happen to occur, and that both parties are comfortable with the arrangement. It isn’t worth sacrificing a dear friendship or family relationship over a couple hundred dollars at the vet — especially when the welfare of your pet is in the balance.

Changing Environments Can be Hard for Pets & People

Housebreaking, healthy eating habits, and good sleeping patterns are largely related to the dog’s home environment. Shaking it up by having your pet stay in different homes with different schedules and different rules can be confusing. Just like potty training a child, breaking co-sleeping habits, and weaning a baby can be stressful when you travel or stay somewhere new, the same is true for your pet. If your dog has just recently learned to go potty outside or has eating or sleeping issues, it’s strongly advisable to board them at a facility with professional caregivers than to confuse your dog and make things more difficult for him by switching houses.

Your friends and family are no doubt well-meaning, and they are probably excellent pet owners themselves! But there are some liability and other issues to consider before asking them to keep your dog. Especially if your dog has behavioral issues, socialization issues (such as fear of strangers or food guarding), or doesn’t adjust well to different situations, it’s probably best to use a professional boarding facility. They will keep your dog on the diet, exercise, and play schedule that he’s used to, and you won’t have to worry about whether or not someone got off work in time to let him out before all your hard-earned housebreaking efforts to kaput.

Why Friends & Family May be the Worst Option for Boarding Your Pet

Let the experts at Just Happy Hounds love your pet while you’re away so you don’t have to worry about why friends & family may be the worst option for boarding your pet.  At Just Happy Hounds, we love ’em just like you do!

For more information about Just Happy Hounds, THE premier dog fraternity, or would like to schedule dog boarding, please contact us at 205.777.3699.

Just Happy Hounds THE premier dog fraternity to enhance your dog's life | 205.777.3699

 

What are the Best Options for Training Your Dog?  Whether you just adopted a tiny pup or rescued an older dog from a shelter or special group, chances are that you've already lost a shoe or two and the wooden legs of the living room furniture are in imminent danger. Spots on the carpet, shredded mini blinds, and gnawed

What are the Best Options for Training Your Dog?

What are the Best Options for Training Your Dog?  Whether you just adopted a tiny pup or rescued an older dog from a shelter or special group, chances are that you’ve already lost a shoe or two and the wooden legs of the living room furniture are in imminent danger. Spots on the carpet, shredded mini blinds, and gnawed-up door frames are just a few of the tell-tale signs that somebody needs some training!

What are the Best Options for Training Your Dog?  Whether you just adopted a tiny pup or rescued an older dog from a shelter or special group, chances are that you've already lost a shoe or two and the wooden legs of the living room furniture are in imminent danger. Spots on the carpet, shredded mini blinds, and gnawed

Maybe that somebody is you, and maybe it’s your dear little dog, but either way, something has to change. Dog owners today have more options than ever when it comes to puppy and dog training. Here are a few of the choices you’ve got, along with some pros and cons to evaluate which one is right for you and your new furry pal.

DIY Dog Training

Experienced pet owners may wish to save a few bucks and DIY their puppy or dog training. This can be a special bonding experience between you and your new furbaby, but if this is your first foray into dog ownership, you will benefit greatly from at least a few sessions with a professional to get the basics down before going it alone. There are numerous books and online programs to help you DIY your dog training, or you can take one of the dog training seminars offered at Just Happy Hounds.

Private & Group Dog Training Classes

If you choose the professional route, you can opt for either private or group classes for you and your pet. Group classes offer the additional benefit of helping your puppy learn to socialize with other animals while also learning the basic commands. Private classes are usually more expensive, but if you’ve rescued a dog from a bad situation and they came with some difficult behavioral issues, this one-on-one, customized training can be immensely valuable in helping your dog to heal and recover.

Obedience Training & Behavioral Training

There are two basic types of public and group dog training courses: obedience training and behavioral training. Obedience training focuses on helping the dog to learn to obey you and understand basic commands like “sit” “stay” and “wait”. Behavioral training is often a part of obedience training, or can be offered as a stand-alone course. Behavioral training is ideal for puppies, and addresses common issues like behaving well around people and other pets, when it’s okay to bark and when it isn’t, addressing chewing issues, and helping the owner with housebreaking efforts. Both behavioral and obedience dog training are available as either group or private classes.

Boarding School Dog Training (Puppy Boot Camp)

Instead of taking your dog to training classes each week, you can opt for a boarding school style dog training. These are like doggie resorts. Classes are offered at various levels, from beginner through advanced. Puppies or dogs go to the resort, where they are given intensive training that includes a variety of socialization, behavioral and obedience training, and more. Dogs return to their owner with great new habits and skills, freshly groomed and ready to be happy, productive members of the family.

Vocational / Service Dog Training

Many pet owners choose to get their dogs certified in a vocational service. Some of the most common types of service dogs are those who help disabled owners with daily tasks. Dogs are subjected to intensive testing before training, to assure that they have the abilities to learn to become a service dog. Once they pass, they go through a rigorous training program to help their owners with any number of daily tasks and chores to make life easier and better for their human companion.

What are the Best Options for Training Your Dog?

Working dogs are happy dogs! Pet owners who suffer from anxiety, seizures, heart conditions, limited mobility, visual or auditory impairment, or many other issues can tremendously benefit from having their dog certified as a service pet. This type of training does need to be done by a professional dog trainer, because the skills the dogs need to learn far surpass what most owners would be able to achieve from just reading a book or taking an online course.

No matter which option you choose, Just Happy Hounds can help as you ask yourself what are the best options for training your dog. From seminars and dog training classes to private sessions with a professional dog trainer, we offer a wide range of product and services to get you and your furry BFF off to the very best possible start together. See what options we offer to help you get started with the right training program today!

Why a Doggie Daycare is the Best Option for Your Furbaby  |  It happened again. You came home from work, thrilled to see your amazing, loveable, adorable dog, only to find your brand new Birkenstocks shredded, the fruit bowl spilled (and smashed to bits) on the floor, and a fresh "oops" in the hallway.

Why a Doggie Daycare is the Best Option for Your Furbaby

Why a Doggie Daycare is the Best Option for Your Furbaby  |  It happened again. You came home from work, thrilled to see your amazing, loveable, adorable dog, only to find your brand new Birkenstocks shredded, the fruit bowl spilled (and smashed to bits) on the floor, and a fresh “oops” in the hallway.

Why a Doggie Daycare is the Best Option for Your Furbaby  |  It happened again. You came home from work, thrilled to see your amazing, loveable, adorable dog, only to find your brand new Birkenstocks shredded, the fruit bowl spilled (and smashed to bits) on the floor, and a fresh "oops" in the hallway.

You’ve tried everything — scolding, crating, coming home during breaks and lunch to walk him, and even paying the neighbor to come let him out during the day. How are you supposed to have a life (and a home!) with this unbelievably destructive creature? How did that precious pup grow into such a gangly instrument of demolition?

Why a Doggie Daycare is the Best Option for Your Furbaby

Truth be told, the fix is easier than you think. By investing in a doggie daycare, you not only keep your furbaby out of trouble, you also protect the investments you’ve made in your home, clothing, and furniture. Here are just a few of the many advantages of taking your loveable, but infuriating, little chewing machine to doggie daycare.

Boredom Leads to Misbehavior

Just like people, dogs are just more likely to get into trouble when they’re bored out of their minds. Doggie daycare keeps your dog’s body and mind active, so that he isn’t so stressed out. You’ll quickly notice a sharp decline in undesirable behaviors like excessive barking and acting out.

A Well-Socialized Dog Loves Everybody!

Have you ever noticed that hermits are grouchy? That’s because social interaction fosters healthy interactions with everyone. Pet experts recommend socializing dogs, especially developing puppies, to as many people, animals, and situations as possible, so that they learn to adjust. This helps thwart issues like nervousness and fearfulness, which can lead to behavioral issues like food guarding and nipping at strangers. Look for a doggie daycare that exposes your dog to a variety of different people, situations, and animals.

Exercise Means a Longer, Healthier Life for Your Pet

Chances are, the only exercise your dog gets while home alone is jumping on the couch and dragging your clean laundry around the den. At doggie daycare, they’ll get abundant exercise. Just like us, that helps him have a healthier weight, stronger heart, heartier immune system, higher lung capacity, and most importantly, a longer, healthier life. Want to reduce those vet bills? The exercise they get at doggie daycare seriously helps.

Doggie Daycare Helps Foster a Well-Trained Pup

Most doggie daycares offer some training. Experienced workers help your dog learn basic canine education like not going boo boo indoors, not jumping up on people, not barking at the wind blowing, and sitting on command. You may also consider having a formal training session during the week while your dog is already at the daycare facility.

Dogs are Safer in Daycare Than Home Alone

Do you sit at work, worried about what happens if the apartment catches on fire or someone breaks in while your pet is home alone? Home Alone made a cute movie, but it isn’t funny when real pets or children are in danger. Give yourself (and your pet) peace of mind, knowing that trained, experienced caregivers are there to help handle anything that happens while you have to be away from your dog.

Your Dog Will Sleep Better at Night (And So Will You!)

When you get home from work, exhausted and ready to crash in front of dinner and Netflix, your dog sees his first chance for interaction all day. You’re trying to rest, while he’s trying to make up for the loving he didn’t get while you were gone! At doggie daycare, he’ll expend much of his energy playing with his pet pals, so you’re both on the same “chill out” page when you get home for the evening. Plus, fewer wake-up calls for loving or potty during the middle of the night — zzzzz …

Grooming is No Longer a Time-Consuming, Inconvenient Extra Trip

Isn’t it next to impossible to get your dog to the groomer when you have to work? Like training, you can schedule pet grooming during the day while he’s already at the doggie daycare facility. All you have to do is pick up your pretty, clean pup when you get off!

You Don’t Have to Worry About Strangers Coming Into Your Home

One option to leaving your dog home alone all day is hiring a pet sitter. But do you really want a stranger coming into your home while you’re gone? In an age when horrifying news about people we know and trust breaks almost daily, it pays to keep those doors locked and windows shut tight, especially when you’re away for hours each day, and your dog is home, defenseless.

You Don’t Have to Jeopardize Your Career to Rush Home and Let Fido Out

Want to impress the boss by putting in a few extra hours or taking up the slack when a coworker is out? You can’t always do that when you know your dog is doing the potty dance with floating eyeballs, waiting for you to let him out. Give your career a boost by trusting doggie daycare with your pet, so you can focus on work when it’s time to work and be 100% for your pet when you get home.

At Just Happy Hounds, we love ’em like you do! Let us take care of your pet while you take care of work, school, and other daily responsibilities. When the day is done, your well-fed, well-loved, well-exercised, well-groomed, and well-behaved furbaby will be ready and waiting!

Just Happy Hounds Dog Fraternity is the premier place to bring your dog to enhance your dog’s life.  For more information, please contact us at 205.777.3699.

15 Ways to Protect Your Dog in Winter | 1. Let’s talk temperature! Some dog breeds are blessed with thick fur that keeps them warm naturally, even in very cold temperatures, but dogs with thin coats may need to wear a sweater or coat when out for winter walks.

15 Ways to Protect Your Dog in Winter

15 Ways to Protect Your Dog in Winter

1. Let’s talk temperature!
Some dog breeds are blessed with thick fur that keeps them warm naturally, even in very cold temperatures, but dogs with thin coats may need to wear a sweater or coat when out for winter walks. A good coat should reach from the neck to the base of the tail and also protect the belly. But remember that coats will not prevent frostbite on the ears, feet or tail … so even with a cozy coat, don’t keep your short haired dog out too long in freezing temperatures.

2. Go outside when the sun shines
If your dog feels the cold, try to walk her in the late morning or early afternoon hours when temperatures are a little warmer, and avoid early morning or late evening walks. Spend time playing outdoors while it’s sunny; sunshine brings the added benefit of providing both you and your pet with vitamin D. Play fetch with toys, not sticks, which can cause choking and other injuries. So, if your dog likes to chew and chase, pack a Frisbee, ball or other safe toy and play together in the sun.

3. Limit outdoor time in winter
Your family pet may love to spend time outdoors but in winter even the furriest dog can get cold. Ears, paws and tails are all susceptible to frostbite. Take your dog out frequently for walks, exercise and play … but when the temperature drops, don’t leave him outdoors for long periods of time. A good rule is to go out with him and when you’re ready to come in, he probably will be too. If he’s outside in your yard by himself, check often to make sure he’s not showing signs of feeling cold.

15 Ways to Protect Your Dog in Winter

4. Cozy bedding
In addition to limiting your dog’s time outdoors on cold days, don’t let your pooch sleep on a cold floor in winter. Choosing the right bedding is vital to ensure your dog stays warm. Warm blankets can create a snug environment; raised beds can keep your dog off cold tiles or concrete, and heated pet beds can help keep the stiffness out of aging joints. Place your dog’s bed in a warm spot away from drafts, cold tile or uncarpeted floors, preferably in a favorite spot where she sleeps every day so that the area doesn’t feel unfamiliar.

5. Protect your dog from heaters
Dogs will often seek heat during cold winter weather by snuggling too close to heating sources. Avoid space heaters and install baseboard radiator covers to avoid your pet getting burned. Fireplaces also pose a major threat so please make sure you have a pet proof system to keep your heat-seeking pal out of harm’s way!

6. Moisturize
Dry and cold weather can do a number on your pet’s skin. Help prevent dry, flaky skin by adding a skin and coat supplement to her food. Coconut oil is a good natural moisturizer that can help keep your pet’s skin and coat healthy. If you find your pet’s paws, ears or tail are dry or cracking, you can also apply coconut oil topically as needed.

7. No overfeeding please!
Although dogs may need an extra layer in winter, make sure it comes from a coat and not a layer of fat. Cold temperatures may even bring on lazy behavior and the need for fewer calories. Be attentive to your dog’s activity level and adjust her calories accordingly. A high quality, whole foods, preferably raw meat based diet will help ensure a healthy coat and good energy for the cold winter months.

8. Keep your dog hydrated
Dogs can dehydrate just as quickly in winter as summer. Although many dogs eat snow, it’s not an adequate substitute for fresh water. If your dog spends time outdoors in your yard, make sure she has access to a water bowl, check it often and break ice that forms on top.

9. Groom your dog
Your dog needs a clean, well-groomed coat to keep her properly insulated. This is especially important if your dog spends a lot of time outdoors. After bathing, dry your dog thoroughly, especially before allowing her outside.

10. Paw care is a must
Just as we tend to develop foot cracks in winter, dogs can also suffer from cracked pads. If your dog has furry feet, trim the hair that grows between her pads to prevent ice buildup between the pads. Winter salt on city sidewalks can also burn your dog’s pads and is toxic, so after walks around the neighborhood, rinse or wipe your dog’s paws to remove any salt – you don’t want her licking it off. If your dog shows signs of discomfort when walking outside on frozen or salted surfaces, consider using dog booties to protect her paws.

15 Ways to Protect Your Dog in Winter | 1. Let’s talk temperature!  Some dog breeds are blessed with thick fur that keeps them warm naturally, even in very cold temperatures, but dogs with thin coats may need to wear a sweater or coat when out for winter walks.

11. Snow removal
Snow can be a lot of fun but it can also be dangerous for your dog. Snow piled near fences offers your dog escape routes that even well-trained dogs often can’t resist. When you clear snow in your yard, pile it away from fences to prevent your dog from climbing over. Snow and ice often accumulate on rooftops and if the sun is out or as temperatures rise, this accumulation can slide and injure your dog. If you can’t clear the snow from the roof, keep your dog away from the roof overhang to prevent injury.

12. Watch where your dog plays
Although your dog is likely having a great time outdoors, take frequent indoor breaks for water and warming and don’t ever stay out too long. If you’re walking or playing in unfamiliar areas, keep your dog close. It’s easy for her to venture onto unsafe surfaces such as frozen ponds or lakes. These may be covered in snow and not easily visible.

13. Avoid exposure to toxins
With winter comes antifreeze. Antifreeze tastes sweet and dogs (as well as some children!) will readily lick or drink it. Antifreeze is extremely toxic and just a small amount can be fatal. Keep your dog out of the garage and off the driveway where she may encounter antifreeze or other harmful chemicals.

14. NEVER leave your dog unattended in the car, no matter what the season
Just as cars can get dangerously hot in summer, freezing cold temperatures are equally dangerous for your dog in winter. Leaving the car running involves additional risks, including carbon monoxide poisoning if the car is parked in a garage. Leave your dog at home when you go out to run errands.

15. Special care for seniors
Cold weather will often aggravate existing medical conditions in dogs, particularly arthritis. It’s very important to maintain an exercise regimen with your arthritic dog, but be mindful of slippery surfaces and make sure your dog has a warm soft rest area to recuperate after activity. If you don’t already give your senior dog a natural joint supplement to lubricate the joints and ease the discomfort of arthritis, you may want to consider adding one in winter. Just like people, dogs are more susceptible to other illnesses during winter weather.

15 Ways to Protect Your Dog in Winter

This article came from Dogs Naturally Magazine. To read full article, please visit: http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/15-winter-care-tips-for-your-dog/


Because…

…we love em’ like you do!

Just Happy Hounds, LLC – Midtown located at 2222 5th Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama  35233

your premiere doggie daycare, dog boarding, grooming and training.

205.777.3699